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Notes from Underground (1864)

by Fyodor Dostoevsky

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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11,263142500 (4.06)2 / 360
Notes from the Underground is a short novel by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It is considered by many to be the world's first existentialist novel. It presents itself as an excerpt from the rambling memoirs of a bitter, isolated, unnamed narrator (generally referred to by critics as the Underground Man) who is a retired civil servant living in St. Petersburg. The first part of the story is told in monologue form, or the underground man's diary, and attacks emerging Western philosophy, especially Nikolay Chernyshevsky's What Is to Be Done'. The second part of the book is called "Apropos of the Wet Snow," and describes certain events that, it seems, are destroying, and sometimes renewing the underground man, who acts as a first person, omniscient narrator.… (more)
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English (123)  Italian (4)  Swedish (3)  Dutch (3)  Spanish (3)  French (1)  Greek (1)  Hungarian (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  All languages (140)
Showing 1-5 of 123 (next | show all)
Como sei que é verdade que um certo nível de identificação pesa pra mim quando levo em conta livros escritos por seus próprios personagens (isto é, memórias, diários etc), devo começar por dizer que o extremo exagero romântico do personagem enrustido me afasta. Na vida, o subsolo é um ideal ridículo, e por mais que o próprio declare que o saiba, que saiba de sua histeria, está pronto a discursar, incapaz de tecer a via do meio, da sociabilidade minimamente apaziguadora. Seria ela horrorosa? Sim, mas o que importa, somos parte dela e o comedimento é a arma para evitar que o subterrâneo ressurja justamente como o ridiculamente irresolvível. Talvez alguém versado em psicologia possa explicar melhor o caráter de anti-herói desprezível do protagonista. Mas como o acho hiperbólico demais, penso que o livro torna-se assim distante - o que há de verdade comportamental se dilui no tragicômico de alguém que eu gostaria de evitar a todo modo. ( )
  henrique_iwao | Aug 30, 2022 |
Den Essayteil "Aufzeichnungen aus dem Kellerloch" genossen, die Novelle "Bei nassem Schnee" abgebrochen.
Quintessenz für mich: Tatmenschen sind dumm, sie wollen, müssen sich ablenken. Geistesmenschen stehen darüber. ( )
  chepedaja3527 | Aug 23, 2022 |
Seems to be pretty standard for Fyodor's protagonists to confuse agonizing and obsessing over things with being intelligent and cultured. ( )
  mkfs | Aug 13, 2022 |
4.5

The thoughts of someone who has chosen to isolate himself from the rest of society, disillusioned by the ultimately meaningless search for the "beautiful and lofty." I read this as part of my personal project of reading the existentialist canon, but the introduction made me think of this primarily as a response to the utopian socialist and utilitarian ideals of the nineteenth century, a movement that inspired the Russian revolution of 1917.

Nikolay Chernyshevsky (one of the main proponents of the aforementioned movement) in his novel What is to be done? championed collectivist associations and asceticism, the submission of all personal goals to that of the collective. Underground Man defies that by saying man has a natural instinct of individualism, and that were we to receive the perfect utopian life, we would ultimately reject it.

Chernyshevsky's novel is radically collectivist, while Dostoyevsky's is radically individualist. It's no surprise Notes from Underground is considered one of the first existentialist novels. It takes the rejection of the singular life purpose to the extreme—a lifetime lived from a place of societal rejection, from the Underground.

Personally neither of them sound appealing. Subordinating yourself to the collective seems a bleak, thankless, tiring life. I also couldn't fully commit to what the protagonist had done. I think I love life too much, that as insignificant as it is sometimes, somehow I still want to be a part of it. ( )
  kahell | May 4, 2022 |
Although the first part meanders a bit too much for my liking, I found "Notes from the Underground" to be an ultimately relatable and insightful experience. To find so many of my own "unconventional" thoughts mirrored in a character completely different from myself prompted a series of self-reflections that haven't stopped yet. Also, the more I think about the ending, the harder it hits. ( )
  yuef3i | Sep 19, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 123 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (156 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dostoevsky, Fyodorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Adrian, EsaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Aplin, HughTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Appelbaum, StanleyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cansinos Assens, RafaelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Coulson, JessieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dekker, PietTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
FitzLyon, KyrilTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Garnett, ConstanceTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Geier, SwetlanaÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ginsburg, MirraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ginzburg, LeoneContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guidall, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hughes, JennyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ingold, Felix PhilippTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kallama, ValtoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kennedy, Paul E.Cover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
López-Morillas, JuanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lönnqvist, BarbaraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pacini, GianlorenzoEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pacini, GianlorenzoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pevear, RichardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Polledro, AlfredoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Praag, S. vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Randall, NatashaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Roseen, UllaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Self, WillForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, PhilipEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Steiner, GeorgeForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Volokhonsky, LarissaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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I am a sick man. ... I am a spiteful man.
I am a sick man... I am a wicked man.
Quotations
"I wished to stifle with external sensations all that was ceaselessly boiling up inside me."
"...because for a woman it is in love that all resurrection, all salvation from ruin of whatever sort, and all regenerations consists, nor can it reveal itself in anything but this."
"Leave us to ourselves without a book and we'll immediately get confused, lost -- we won't know what to join, what to hold to, what to love and what to hate, what to respect and what to despise."
At home, I merely used to read. Reading stirred, delighted, and tormented me.
It is impossible for an intelligent man seriously to become anything, and only fools become something.
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Wikipedia in English (2)

Notes from the Underground is a short novel by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. It is considered by many to be the world's first existentialist novel. It presents itself as an excerpt from the rambling memoirs of a bitter, isolated, unnamed narrator (generally referred to by critics as the Underground Man) who is a retired civil servant living in St. Petersburg. The first part of the story is told in monologue form, or the underground man's diary, and attacks emerging Western philosophy, especially Nikolay Chernyshevsky's What Is to Be Done'. The second part of the book is called "Apropos of the Wet Snow," and describes certain events that, it seems, are destroying, and sometimes renewing the underground man, who acts as a first person, omniscient narrator.

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Nella prima parte, "Il sottosuolo", il protagonista racconta la sua infanzia e la formazione della personalità più nascosta (il sottosuolo per l'appunto). Nella seconda, "A proposito della neve fradicia", ripercorre alcuni episodi della sua vita dove più emerge il "sottosuolo". Segue alcuni compagni di scuola ad una cena, sfoga poi l'amarezza per le offese subite su Liza, una prostituta incontrata in una casa di tolleranza, mostrandole con durezza che cosa l'aspetta nel futuro. Dopo qualche giorno Liza ritorna da lui col desiderio di una vita pura, ma viene trattata con disprezzo e volgarità. Per umiliarla le mette in mano un biglietto da cinque rubli, che poi ritroverà sul suo tavolo quando la donna se ne sarà andata, testimonianza della grande dignità di Liza.
(piopas)
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Penguin Australia

3 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0451529553, 0141024917, 0141194863

Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.

An edition of this book was published by Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co..

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Voland Edizioni

An edition of this book was published by Voland Edizioni.

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Urban Romantics

3 editions of this book were published by Urban Romantics.

Editions: 1907832475, 1907832483, 1907832491

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

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