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Rebecca (1938)

by Daphne du Maurier

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
18,136548217 (4.22)3 / 1659
Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again... Working as a lady's companion, the heroine of REBECCA learns her place. Her future looks bleak until, on a trip to the South of France, she meets Max de Winter, a handsome widower whose sudden proposal of marriage takes her by surprise. She accepts, but whisked from glamorous Monte Carlo to the ominous and brooding Manderley, the new Mrs de Winter finds Max a changed man. And the memory of his dead wife Rebecca is forever kept alive by the forbidding housekeeper, Mrs Danvers... Not since Jane Eyre has a heroine faced such difficulty with the Other Woman. An international bestseller that has never gone out of print, REBECCA is the haunting story of a young girl consumed by love and the struggle to find her identity.… (more)
  1. 366
    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë (chrisharpe, fannyprice, ladybug74, HollyMS, lottpoet)
    chrisharpe: There are some similarities between these two books: a young woman marries an older widower and moves to his mansion, where the marriage is challenged by the unearthly presence of the first wife.
    fannyprice: These two books reminded me a lot of each other but Rebecca was more modern and somewhat less preachy.
    HollyMS: Since Rebecca was published, observers have noticed that it has parallels to Jane Eyre. Both are dark stories about young women who marry wealthy Englishmen.
    lottpoet: I can see the bones of Jane Eyre in Rebecca
  2. 222
    My Cousin Rachel by Daphne Du Maurier (HollyMS, EllieH)
    HollyMS: Daphne Du Maurier's My Cousin Rachel has a similar theme as Rebecca.
  3. 131
    Jamaica Inn by Daphne Du Maurier (katie4098)
  4. 143
    The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield (citygirl)
  5. 110
    The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins (starfishian)
  6. 90
    Lady Audley's Secret by Mary Elizabeth Braddon (kiwiflowa, lahochstetler)
  7. 91
    The Scapegoat by Daphne Du Maurier (lois1)
  8. 70
    Lorna Doone by R. D. Blackmore (Sylak)
    Sylak: Another saga set against a hauntingly beautiful landscape - but this time its in Exmoor.
  9. 82
    We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson (teelgee)
  10. 50
    Thornyhold by Mary Stewart (whymaggiemay)
    whymaggiemay: Although I believe that du Maurier was the better writer, Thornyhold and many others by Mary Stewart give the same suspenseful feeling.
  11. 51
    Don't Look Now and Other Stories [10 stories, Folio Society] by Daphne Du Maurier (Z-Ryan, cometahalley)
  12. 51
    The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton (DaraBrooke)
  13. 84
    Mistress of Mellyn by Victoria Holt (kraaivrouw, FutureMrsJoshGroban, Headinherbooks_27)
  14. 30
    Nine Coaches Waiting by Mary Stewart (Headinherbooks_27)
  15. 30
    Freedom and Necessity by Steven Brust (bjappleg8)
    bjappleg8: first person narrative; ambiguous supernatural elements; slow unravelling of a mystery in a historical British setting
  16. 20
    Vera by Elizabeth von Arnim (bell7)
  17. 42
    A Sucessora by Carolina Nabuco (HollyMS, Anonymous user)
    HollyMS: When Rebecca came out, there were accusations that Daphne du Maurier had plagiarized A sucessora (The Sucessor) by Brazilian author Carolina Nabuco. Read it and decide for yourself.
  18. 10
    Alena by Rachel Pastan (TheLittlePhrase)
  19. 21
    Vanishing Cornwall by Daphne du Maurier (Z-Ryan)
  20. 10
    Yes, My Darling Daughter by Margaret Leroy (WildMaggie)

(see all 36 recommendations)

To Read (91)
My TBR (4)
1930s (6)
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English (529)  Spanish (5)  French (4)  Italian (3)  German (3)  Swedish (2)  Norwegian (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  All languages (548)
Showing 1-5 of 529 (next | show all)
Du Maurier has a peculiar style, wordy and repetitive and quiet. It suits the narrator perfectly, and elevated this story from fascinating to brilliant. ( )
  AlainaZ | Jun 5, 2022 |
Classic novel ... just too much like Dickens for me. Very drawn out. ( )
  BookLeafs | May 26, 2022 |
Puoi trovare questa recensione anche sul mio blog, La siepe di more

Sono rimasta piuttosto sorpresa dalla lettura di Rebecca la prima moglie: nella mia testa era “solo” un romanzo sulla presenza ingombrante di una moglie defunta e sulla governante più inquietante mai partorita dalla mente umana, la celeberrima signora Danvers; invece mi sono ritrovata a leggere una storia molto intrigante e sulla quale mi sono arrovellata un bel po’.

Du Maurier inizia raccontando quello che potrebbe essere l’arrivo del Principe Azzurro/Maxim de Winter che salva la Fanciulla da una Matrigna arcigna/Van Hopper, sposandola e portandola nel suo castello. Tuttavia, fin da subito abbiamo sentore di un disagio strisciante: innanzi tutto questa fanciulla non ha un nome e nemmeno una gran personalità, a quanto pare il suo più grande pregio. Dopo tutto c’è già stata Rebecca accanto a questo Principe Azzurro: una donna indomabile è più che sufficiente nella vita, grazie tante.

Infatti, se la personalità della seconda signora De Winter è docile e assolutamente assuefatta ai suoi sentimenti per il marito, quella di Rebecca è così strabordante da tracimare anche i limiti della morte e da continuare a influenzare le vite di coloro che le erano più vicino. Rebecca sembra non avere misura: eccessiva in tutto, che si trattasse di bellezza, perversione, femminilità o autorità. Troppo eccessiva per una società che faceva della modestia femminile un ideale imprescindibile e che non si faceva troppi scrupoli nel punire e reprimere ogni impudicizia.

Arrivata alla fine del romanzo non ho potuto fare a meno di chiedermi chi fosse davvero Rebecca, della quale non abbiamo mai il punto di vista, ma ci viene solo raccontata, sia da chi la odiava, sia da chi la idolatrava. Non una santa o una puttana, ma più probabilmente una donna che vedeva la subalternità agli uomini alla quale era costretta, la trovava intollerabile e cercava di ribellarsi come poteva, anche con mezzi immorali, e senza fare sconti alle donne che invece si piegavano accondiscendenti a quella dominazione. Non il più positivo dei modelli, ma Rebecca si è conquistata la mia simpatia: cosa ce ne facciamo di donne ideali quando possiamo speculare su quelle controverse? ( )
  Baylee_Lasiepedimore | May 13, 2022 |
I can’t believe I’m only just now reading this book for the first time! This book is beautifully written, although it’s a little slow in the beginning. The ending will keep you up at night, and the very last page will leave you breathless. The characters are likeable and the love story is not at all like a fairytale. In fact, until about 65% of the way through the book, you won’t even be sure there IS a love story. One of the most curious things about this book is that the narrator and heroine is never given a Christian name, allowing you to immerse yourself in her character. There’s a reason this book has been deemed a timeless masterpiece, but I really don’t want to say much more and risk spoiling it for anyone.

Take a journey to Manderley and see if it doesn’t haunt you the same way it does the narrator...
( )
  TrojaHousehold | Apr 14, 2022 |
This book was utterly haunting, from the very first page, from even the first sentence, I was enthralled and had to keep turning the paged

The plot follows a timid and nameless heroine who by chance meets recent widower Maxim de Winter and consequently, they soon are wed and he takes her back to Manderlay, his estate.
Eventually, she learns of Rebecca, his first wife who tragically drowned, she struggles to differentiate herself from Rebecca and all the while, frets of Maxim not truly being over Rebecca.


I love when classics are written in a way that enthrals you and is easy to understand, I also enjoy an occasional mystery or thriller. Thrillers usually are set right as the person is missing or dead so for this psychological thriller to be set after the death, it was certainly unique. For a classic, the genre of this book is unique for its time.

The writing was really well-done. The atmosphere and tone of this book were so eerie but engaging from the very first page. I loved how chilling and engaging it was and how easy it is to understand. The author really sets the tone of the book right away and her description of Manderlay was very detailed.

The characters were alright and certainly did improve and have depth as the book went on.

The Unnamed Heroine was a character who had the start, I didn't know what to think of her. As time goes on, she becomes a lot better as you see a clear depth of her struggles. I think her eagerness to impress others is something people of all genders and ages can relate to, I certainly have been eager to impress others multiple times in my life. I think the struggle to separate herself from Rebecca was well written.

Rebecca, while not actually present in the book feels so real, every mention breaths more life into this character that haunts every move the living characters make and without her, this story would not exist. There's definitely a lot more about her that I wasn't expecting to hear.

Maxim was alright, but I seem to resonate with the protagonist's struggles more since everything is from her eyes. Maxim fell flat for me for the majority of the book but I definitely thought different once the depths of his character surfaced later on in the story.

I loved the way the characters were written, it was like different webs unravelled as time went on.


Overall, this book was really chilling and very engaging. There are so many different parts of the characters that I was left shocked by the true nature of some of the characters. The writing was readable and flowed. ( )
  crazynerd | Mar 30, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 529 (next | show all)
"Rebecca is a lowbrow story with a middlebrow finish,” announced The Times Literary Supplement when Daphne du Maurier’s bestselling novel was first issued in 1938. Critic V.S. Pritchett was even more dismissive in his review, announcing that Rebecca "would be here today, gone tomorrow." The novel did generate positive coverage in Good Housekeeping and Ladies Home Journal, but that kind of praise did more harm than good in elite literary circles.... [the] novel has slowly climbed the path from lowbrow to highbrow in the eight decades since its initial publication, and is now more likely encountered on a college syllabus than at a supermarket checkout counter. You will now find Rebecca on the assigned reading lists of classes on gender politics, British fiction, Gothic style and other academic subjects.... Rebecca ranks among the most acute literary explorations of jealousy.... In truth, plot plays only a small part in the lasting success of this novel. The story itself is simple, and even the supposedly surprising twists are often telegraphed long in advance. What sets Rebecca apart from its peers is its author’s mastery of tone and mood, emotion and psychology.
 

» Add other authors (50 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
du Maurier, Daphneprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Beauman, SallyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burnett, VirgilCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Clark, Emma ChichesterIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dietsch, J.N.C. vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hoffman, H. LawrenceCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kortemeier, S.Cover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Massey, AnnaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Metcalf, JordanCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Scalero, AlessandraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schab, Karin vonÜbersetzersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stibolt, HelenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vasara, HelviTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.
Quotations
'You see,' she said, snapping the top, and walking down the stairs, 'you are so very different from Rebecca.'
We came to Manderley in early May, arriving, so Maxim said, with the first swallows and the bluebells. It would be the best moment, before the full flush of summer, and in the valley the azaleas would be prodigal of scent and the blood-red rhododendrons in bloom.
Forget it, Mrs. de Winter, forget it, as he has done, thank heaven, and the rest of us. We none of us want to bring back the past, Maxim least of all. And it's up to you, you know, to lead us away from it. Not to take us back there again.
If only there could be an invention that bottled up a memory, like scent. And it never faded, and it never got stale. And then, when one wanted it, the bottle could be uncorked, and it would be like living the moment all over again.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again... Working as a lady's companion, the heroine of REBECCA learns her place. Her future looks bleak until, on a trip to the South of France, she meets Max de Winter, a handsome widower whose sudden proposal of marriage takes her by surprise. She accepts, but whisked from glamorous Monte Carlo to the ominous and brooding Manderley, the new Mrs de Winter finds Max a changed man. And the memory of his dead wife Rebecca is forever kept alive by the forbidding housekeeper, Mrs Danvers... Not since Jane Eyre has a heroine faced such difficulty with the Other Woman. An international bestseller that has never gone out of print, REBECCA is the haunting story of a young girl consumed by love and the struggle to find her identity.

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Book description
"Last night I dreamed I went to Manderley again..."

So the second Mrs. Maxim de Winter remembered the chilling events that led her down the turning drive past the beeches, white and naked, to the isolated gray stone manse on the windswept Cornish coast. Working as a lady's companion, she learns her place. Her future looks bleak until, on a trip to the South of France, she meets Max de Winter, a handsome widower whose sudden proprosal of marriage takes her by surprise. She accepts, but whisked from glamorous Monte Carlo to the ominous and brooding Manderley, the new Mrs de Winter finds Max a changed man. 

With a husband she barely knew, the young bride arrived at this immense estate, only to be inexorably drawn into the life of the first Mrs. de Winter, the beautiful Rebecca, dead but never forgotten... her suite of rooms never touched, her clothes ready to be worn, her servant -- the sinister Mrs. Danvers -- still loyal. And as an eerie presentiment of evil tightened around her heart, the second Mrs. de Winter began her search for the real fate of Rebecca... for the secrets of Manderley.
Haiku summary
Nameless narrator

marries wealthy widower;

haunting Rebecca.

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