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The Odyssey

by Homer

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Homer's Epic Cycle (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
44,53641325 (4.02)6 / 1228
Homer's best-loved poem, recounting Odysseus' wanderings after the Trojan War. With wit and wile, Odysseus meets the challenges of gods and monsters.
  1. 312
    The Iliad by Homer (caflores)
  2. 243
    The Aeneid by Virgil (caflores)
  3. 162
    The King Must Die by Mary Renault (alalba)
  4. 126
    Ulysses by James Joyce (chrisharpe)
  5. 61
    Homer's Daughter by Robert Graves (MarcusBrutus)
    MarcusBrutus: Robert Graves took the story of "The Odyssey's" authorship and expounds on the theory that it was written by a woman. This is a novel based on that idea.
  6. 62
    The Odyssey: A Modern Sequel by Nikos Kazantzakis (lilithcat)
    lilithcat: Only Greece's greatest modern writer would have the nerve and ability to send Odysseus back on his journeying.
  7. 62
    Sir Gawain and the Green Knight by Gawain Poet (chrisharpe)
  8. 20
    Voyages and Discoveries: Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques & Discoveries of the English Nation by Richard Hakluyt (KayCliff)
  9. 20
    The quest for Ulysses by W. B. Stanford (Michael.Rimmer)
  10. 10
    Antigone; Oedipus Rex; Oedipus at Colonus by Sophocles (chwiggy)
  11. 32
    The Long Ships by Frans G. Bengtsson (chrisharpe)
  12. 43
    The Lost Books of The Odyssey by Zachary Mason (slickdpdx)
  13. 87
    Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing (BookWallah)
    BookWallah: Odysseus & Shackleton both had travails getting home from their epic voyages. Differences in their stories: The former’s took 17 years, lost all his men, & was told as epic poetry. The latter’s took 16 months, saved all his men, & is told as gripping biography.… (more)
  14. 12
    T. E. Lawrence : translating the Bruce Rogers 'Odyssey' by T. E. Lawrence (KayCliff)
  15. 12
    Stories from Homer by Alfred J. Church (KayCliff)
  16. 37
    The Battle of the Labyrinth by Rick Riordan (Jitsusama)
    Jitsusama: An ancient classic revolving around Greek Myth. A great help to better understand the mythology of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series.
  17. 510
    Lawrence of Arabia: The Authorized Biography of T.E. Lawrence by Jeremy Wilson (KayCliff)
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English (343)  Spanish (28)  Catalan (9)  Dutch (8)  Italian (5)  French (4)  Danish (3)  Portuguese (3)  Swedish (3)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  German (1)  Finnish (1)  Russian (1)  All languages (410)
Showing 1-5 of 343 (next | show all)
  GRLopez | Dec 2, 2021 |
Perhaps i'm being a little hard on this one. I'm kind of grading on a curve, because of the many epic poems i've read over the last few years this was the least engaging.
Also it might be that the Alexander Pope translation isn't the best.
Its not to say this didn't have its moments, there were quite a few aspects i liked it just seemed a lot of effort for scant returns.
The aspects i liked the most were the conversations, especially when people were insulting each other, and the characterization of Odysseus.
Odysseus is a real anti-hero, a jaded old warrior who doesn't trust the gods as far as he can throw them, rash, vengeful, a horndog, an almost pathological liar, a vicious fighter with no code of honor, and a fairly terrible husband who misses his stuff far more than his wife, which he tells Penelope to her face!
Overall i found it a difficult read and constantly found my mind wandering from the page. ( )
  wreade1872 | Nov 28, 2021 |
The Odyssey, one of the greatest epics of humankind, has been splendidly translated by Ian Johnston in this edition, and the numerous footnotes are so informative that they deserve a lot of praise. The story of the brave and resourceful hero's travels and adventures is quite thrilling. But, there are just too many character names and I can remember only a handful so soon after finishing the book. Also, having read both the Iliad and the Odyssey, I think I like the former better. ( )
  aravind_aar | Nov 21, 2021 |
To atone for missing my Shakespeare last summer I tackled the mighty Odyssey...just kidding, it's actually something I've wanted to read for a very long time, especially since I was ripped off in high school by just being made to watch the atrocious 1990s TV show. Ugh.

I'm so, so lucky to have had this version to read. Wilson's comprehensive introduction (which, I'll admit, made me groan internally until it started flying by) explains what makes her translation distinct from those before it: not just the iambic pentameter and familiar language, but the reexamination of translations long taken for granted. "A translator has a responsibility to acknowledge her own agency and to wrestle, in explicit and conscious ways, not only with the multiple meanings of the original in its own culture but also with what her own text may mean, and the effects it may have on its readers" (p. 88).

Me being me, I most appreciated Wilson's dedication to being frank about slavery's prevalence and looking for nuance rather than modern stereotype in the depiction of women. She gives a few examples of how past translators have chosen to filter their own vision of Odysseus, Penelope, Telemachus, and others through their own cultural lenses, and states clearly where she has done the same rather than pretending she has produced an "exact" translation. It would be fascinating to have read an older translation side-by-side with this one.

Now I'm itching to dip my toes into The Iliad, which I also haven't read.


Quote Roundup
These are a bit irreverent, since I was already familiar with many of the plot basics just by cultural osmosis.

12:391-393: The gods sent signs--the hides began to twitch,
the meat on skewers started mooing,
raw and cooked. There was the sound of cattle lowing.
If that isn't enough to make you vegetarian, I don't know what is!

12:420-424: The waves bore off
the husk [the hull of the ship] and snapped the mast. But thrown across it
there was a backstay cable, oxhide leather.
With this I lashed the keel and mast together,
and rode them, carried on by fearsome winds.
Odysseus invents windsurfing.

19:14: Weapons themselves can tempt a man to fight.
Apparently having a sword in the house increases the likelihood of death by sword. Hm. Why does that sound familiar? Oh, and it gets said three different times in three different ways. The ancient Greeks could clearly teach us a thing or two about weapons control...

19:573-580
I never knew that Penelope came up with the contest with the battle axes instead of "Clever" Odysseus.

23:228-300: And when
the couple had enjoyed their lovemaking,
they shared another pleasure--telling stories.
How many lit nerds over the years have loved this line?

As a final note, The Odyssey goes down with Pride and Prejudice as having one of the most anticlimactic last lines in classic literature. Ah well, you can't have everything, can you? ( )
1 vote books-n-pickles | Oct 29, 2021 |
This translation by Fitzgerald reads aloud beautifully. The word order and rhythm are especially lovely. Some people say that the translation is old fashioned, but newer translations don't read out loud nearly as well. My youngest daughter (14 yo) and I are currently reading the Odyssey. I started out with her reading the Green translation, because it was supposed to be easier to read. It might be, if one were reading silently, but my daughter consistently misread or stumbled over the Green translation. For an average teen reader, there was something awkward in the sentence structure, even if the vocabulary and idioms were modernized. Fitzgerald translation is easier to read aloud, and comparable to understand. We've switched to the Fitzgerald translation completely. (For study, alongside the Fitzgerald translation, do consider the helpful Guide to the Odyssey by Ralph Hexter.)
1 vote mebrock | Oct 4, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 343 (next | show all)
In this interview, we discuss how her [Wilson's] identity as a woman—and a cis-gendered feminist—informs her translation work, how her Odyssey translation honors both ancient traditions and contemporary reading practices, and what Homer meant when he called Dawn, repeatedly, “rosy-fingered.”
 
(Emily Wilson translation): To read a translation is like looking at a photo of a sculpture: It shows the thing, but not from every angle. Like every translator, Wilson brings out some features more clearly than others. But altogether it’s as good an “Odyssey” as one could hope for.
 
The verse idiom of the 20th century does not allow poets to create a grand style, but Mr. Fagles has been remarkably successful in finding a style that is of our time and yet timeless, dignified and yet animated by the vigor and energy essential to any good rendering of this poem. ... This book is a memorable achievement, and the long and excellent introduction by Bernard Knox is a further bonus, scholarly but also relaxed and compellingly readable. Mr. Fagles's translation of the ''Iliad'' was greeted by a chorus of praise when it appeared; his ''Odyssey'' is a worthy successor.
 

» Add other authors (313 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Homerprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aafjes, BertusTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ameis, Karl FriedrichEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ģiezens, AugustsTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Østbye, PeterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bendz, GerhardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Björkeson, IngvarTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Boutens, P.C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Buckland-Wright, JohnIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burkert, WalterAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Calzecchi Onesti, RosaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cauer, PaulEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chapman, Georgesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Christian, AntonIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Church, Alfred JohnEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Codino, FaustoForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Coornhert, Dierick Volckertsz.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cullen, PatrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Danes, ClaireNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dillon, DianeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dillon, LeoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dimock, George E.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dros, ImmeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Due, Otto SteenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dugas-Montbel, Jean-BaptisteTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eliot, Charles WilliamEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Erni, HansIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fagles, RobertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fitzgerald, RobertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Flaxman, JohnIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fridrihsons, KurtsIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fuchs, J.W.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gelsted, OttoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gertz, Martin ClarentiusTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hentze, CarlEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jones, Peter V.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kirk, G. S.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Knox, BernardIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lagerlöf, ErlandTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lattimore, RichmondTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lawrence, T. E.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Linkomies, EdwinPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lombardo, StanleyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Loomis, Louise RopesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lucas, F. L.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mandelbaum, AllenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Manninen, OttoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mühll, Peter von derEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McKellen, IanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Merry, W. W.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Miller, Walter JamesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Montbel, DugasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Morris, WilliamTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moser, BarryIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pabón, José ManuelEditor literariosecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Palmer, George HerbertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pindemonte, IppolitoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pope, AlexanderTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Porter, Howard N.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rasovsky, YuriNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rees, EnnisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Riba, CarlesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rieu, D. C. H.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rieu, E. V.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rouse, W. H. D.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Saarikoski, PenttiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Segalà i Estalella, LluísTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shaw, BenAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shaw, T. E.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shewring, WalterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Squillace, RobertIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Steinmann, KurtTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stolpe, JanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Svenbro, JesperForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Timmerman, Aegidius W.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vosmaer, C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Voss, Johann HeinrichTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Way, Arthur S.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilding, RichardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, Emily R.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, Jeremy M.Prefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Dedication
To my daughters, Imogen, Psyche, and Freya (Emily Wilson)
First words
The man for wisdom's various arts renown'd,
Long exercised in woes, O Muse! resound;
Who, when his arms had wrought the destined fall
Of sacred Troy, and razed her heaven-built wall,
Wandering from clime to clime, observant stray'd,
Their manners noted, and their states survey'd,
On stormy seas unnumber'd toils he bore,
Safe with his friends to gain his natal shore. (Alexander Pope)
Musa, quell'uom di moltiforme ingegno
Dimmi, che molto errò, poich'ebbe a terra
Gittate d'Ilion le sacre torri;
The Man, O Muse, informe that many a way
Wound with his wisedome to his wished stay;
That wanderd wondrous farre when He the towne
Of sacred Troy had sackt and shiverd downe.
The cities of a world of nations,
With all their manners, mindes and fashions,
He saw and knew; at Sea felt many woes,
Much care sustaind, to save from overthrowes
Himselfe and friends in their retreate for home. (George Chapman)
Tell me, O muse, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wide after he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit, and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he was acquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to save his own life and bring his men safely home. (Samuel Butler)
Tell me, Muse, of the man of many ways, who was driven
far journeys, after he had sacked Troy's sacred citadel.
Many were they whose cities he saw, whose minds he learned of,
many the pains he suffered in his spirit on the wide sea,
struggling for his own life and the homecoming of his companions. (Richmond Lattimore)
Quotations
But by this earth, and by the sky above, and by the waters of the Styx below, which is the strongest oath for blessed gods..." - Calypso, Book 5
... a woman slaving at her quern, in the mill-room attached to the palace of the people's shepherd. There all day twelve women strove their hardest, grinding barley-meal and flour, the marrow of man's strength. (Book XX)
I live in pellucid Ithaca, the island of Mount Neriton, whose upstanding slopes are all a-quiver with the wind-blown leaves. About it lie many other islands very near to one another. My island stands deep in the sea and nearer the west than its neighbours which rather face the dawning and the sun. It is a harsh land, yet it breeds good youths.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
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Homer's best-loved poem, recounting Odysseus' wanderings after the Trojan War. With wit and wile, Odysseus meets the challenges of gods and monsters.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
The Odyssey is the epic poem about the great adventurer Odysseus. After the great fall of Troy, Odysseus has some difficulties finding his way back to Ithaca. He encounters sirens, giants and many other mythical creatures and it takes him 10 years to find his way home. I enjoyed this book because it of the mythology and the adventure that it portrays and I think it is a good read.

AR Level 10.3, 24 pts
Historical Italian translation of Homer's Odyssey. Ippolito Pindemonte (1753-1828) thought that the Odyssey, although lacking the force and beauty of the Iliad, was poetically much nearer to his soul than the Iliad.
Durante il ritorno dalla guerra di Troia, un destino crudele prende a bersagliare Odisseo (Ulisse, per i latini) e i suoi compagni: la loro patria, l'isola di Itaca, pare allontanarsi per sempre, il viaggio sembra impossibile. Lucido e ostinato, pronto a tutto, Odisseo ricorda, previene e si oppone alla sorte, pur di approdare al porto natale e riprendere in pugno il proprio mondo. Ma quel mondo è cambiato, ed è cambiato anche lui. Prefazione di Fausto Codino.
(piopas)
Haiku summary
Greek hero of Troy
Takes long time getting back home
Having adventures.
(pickupsticks)
Son wants his Paw home;
Paw away on business trip—
Sneaks home for bloodbath.
(LeBoeuf)

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Penguin Australia

5 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140268863, 0143039954, 0140449116, 0451530683, 0141192445

HighBridge Audio

An edition of this book was published by HighBridge Audio.

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HighBridge

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Tantor Media

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