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The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark…
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The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Stories (2011)

by Ann VanderMeer (Editor), Jeff VanderMeer (Editor)

Other authors: Daniel Abraham (Contributor), Robert Aickman (Contributor), Michal Ajvaz (Contributor), H. F. Arnold (Contributor), Clive Barker (Contributor)105 more, Laird Barron (Contributor), Eric Basso (Contributor), Charles Beaumont (Contributor), Michel Bernanos (Contributor), Olympe Bhêly-Quénum (Contributor), K Bishop, J. (Contributor), Jerome Bixby (Contributor), Algernon Blackwood (Contributor), Robert Bloch (Contributor), Jorge Luis Borges (Contributor), Ray Bradbury (Contributor), Poppy Z. Brite (Contributor), Octavia E. Butler (Contributor), Dino Buzzati (Contributor), Ramsey Campbell (Contributor), Leonora Carrington (Contributor), Angela Carter (Contributor), Michael Chabon (Contributor), Stepan Chapman (Contributor), Michael Cisco (Contributor), Julio Cortázar (Contributor), F. Marion Crawford (Contributor), Daphne du Maurier (Contributor), Steve Duffy (Contributor), Harlan Ellison (Contributor), Dennis Etchison (Contributor), Brian Evenson (Contributor), Hanns Heinz Ewers (Contributor), Jeffrey Ford (Contributor), Karen Joy Fowler (Contributor), Neil Gaiman (Contributor), William Gibson (Contributor), Stefan Grabinski (Contributor), Elizabeth Hand (Contributor), M. John Harrison (Contributor), Georg Heym (Contributor), Margaret Irwin (Contributor), Shirley Jackson (Contributor), M. R. James (Contributor), Robert Barbour Johnson (Contributor), Stephen Graham Jones (Contributor), Franz Kafka (Contributor), Caitlín R. Kiernan (Contributor), Garry Kilworth (Contributor), Jamaica Kincaid (Contributor), Stephen King (Contributor), Kathe Koja (Contributor), Leena Krohn (Contributor), Alfred Kubin (Contributor), Marc Laidlaw (Contributor), Margo Lanagan (Contributor), Tanith Lee (Contributor), Fritz Leiber (Contributor), Bob Leman (Contributor), Thomas Ligotti (Contributor), Kelly Link (Contributor), Lord Dunsany (Contributor), H. P. Lovecraft (Contributor), George R. R. Martin (Contributor), Abraham Merritt (Contributor), Gustav Meyrink (Contributor), China Miéville (Contributor), China Miéville (Afterword), Premendra Mitra (Contributor), Augusto Monterroso (Contributor), Michael Moorcock (Foreword), Micaela Morrissette (Contributor), Haruki Murakami (Contributor), Reza Negarestani (Contributor), Joyce Carol Oates (Contributor), Ben Okri (Contributor), Craig Padawer (Contributor), Mervyn Peake (Contributor), Jean Ray (Contributor), Mercè Rodoreda (Contributor), Joanna Russ (Contributor), Saki (Contributor), Hagiwara Sakutarō (Contributor), Mark Samuels (Contributor), William Sansom (Contributor), Bruno Schulz (Contributor), Claude Seignolle (Contributor), Michael Shea (Contributor), Lucius Shepard (Contributor), John Shirley (Contributor), Martin Simpson (Contributor), Clark Ashton Smith (Contributor), William Browning Spencer (Contributor), Margaret St. Clair (Contributor), Francis Stevens (Contributor), Rabindranath Tagore (Contributor), James Tiptree, Jr. (Contributor), Lisa Tuttle (Contributor), Amos Tutuola (Contributor), Luigi Ugolini (Contributor), Steven Utley (Contributor), Ann VanderMeer (Introduction), Jeff VanderMeer (Introduction), Jeff VanderMeer (Contributor), Hugh Walpole (Contributor), Liz Williams (Contributor), F. Paul Wilson (Contributor), Gahan Wilson (Contributor), Donald A. Wollheim (Contributor), T. M. Wright (Contributor)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5651729,188 (4.41)110
An oversized anthology of dark and bizarre tales written throughout the past century includes entries by international best-sellers and award-winners, including Neil Gaiman, Stephen King, and Franz Kafka.
  1. 00
    The Complete Stories of Leonora Carrington by Leonora Carrington (andomck)
    andomck: Leonora Carrington is featured in The Weird and is a great example of how weird fiction isn’t just Lovecraftian fiction
  2. 00
    The Shadow over Portage and Main by Keith Cadieux (ShelfMonkey)
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» See also 110 mentions

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A totally masterful put together anthology from Ann & Jeff Vandermeer. Especially awesome is the forweird by Michael Moorcock and the afterweird by China Mieville and the introduction by the Vandermeers as is usual in all of their anthologies is just spectacular. A lesson in weird literature and weird publishing. The selections and author biographies are just so freaking good.

A few of my favorites:
Alfred Kubin, The Other Side (excerpt), 1908 (translation, Austria)
F. Marion Crawford, The Screaming Skull, 1908
Algernon Blackwood, The Willows, 1907
Georg Heym, The Dissection, 1913 (new translation, Germany)
Hanns Heinz Ewers, The Spider, 1915 (translation, Germany)
Rabindranath Tagore, The Hungry Stones, 1916 (India)
Luigi Ugolini, The Vegetable Man, 1917 (first translation, Italy)
Franz Kafka, In the Penal Colony, 1919 (translation, German/Czech)
Stefan Grabinski, The White Weyrak, 1921 (translation, Poland)
H.F. Arnold, The Night Wire, 1926
H.P. Lovecraft, The Dunwich Horror, 1929
Margaret Irwin, The Book, 1930
Hagiwara Sakutaro, The Town of Cats, 1935 (translation, Japan)
Leonora Carrington, White Rabbits, 1941
Donald Wollheim, Mimic, 1942
Ray Bradbury, The Crowd, 1943
William Sansom, The Long Sheet, 1944
Jorge Luis Borges, The Aleph, 1945 (translation, Argentina)
Olympe Bhely-Quenum, A Child in the Bush of Ghosts, 1949 (Benin)
Shirley Jackson, The Summer People, 1950
Margaret St. Clair, The Man Who Sold Rope to the Gnoles, 1951
Robert Bloch, The Hungry House, 1951
Dino Buzzati, The Colomber, 1966 (new translation, Italy)
Michel Bernanos, The Other Side of the Mountain, 1967 (new translation, France)
Merce Rodoreda, The Salamander, 1967 (translation, Catalan)
Claude Seignolle, The Ghoulbird, 1967 (new translation, France)
Gahan Wilson, The Sea Was Wet As Wet Could Be, 1967
Daphne Du Maurier, Don’t Look Now, 1971
Robert Aickman, The Hospice, 1975
Dennis Etchison, It Only Comes Out at Night, 1976
James Tiptree Jr. (Alice Sheldon), The Psychologist Who Wouldn’t Do Terrible Things to Rats, 1976
Eric Basso, The Beak Doctor, 1977
Jamaica Kincaid, Mother, 1978 (Antigua and Barbuda/US)
George R.R. Martin, Sandkings, 1979
Michael Shea, The Autopsy, 1980
Leena Krohn, Tainaron, 1985 (translation, Finland)
Garry Kilworth, Hogfoot Right and Bird-hands, 1987
Kathe Koja, Angels in Love, 1991
Haruki Murakami, The Ice Man, 1991 (translation, Japan)
Jeffrey Ford, The Delicate, 1994
Martin Simpson, Last Rites and Resurrections, 1994
Stephen King, The Man in the Black Suit, 1994
Angela Carter, The Snow Pavilion, 1995
Craig Padawer, The Meat Garden, 1996
Michael Chabon, The God of Dark Laughter, 2001
China Miéville, Details, 2002
Michael Cisco, The Genius of Assassins, 2002
Neil Gaiman, Feeders and Eaters, 2002
Jeff VanderMeer, The Cage, 2002
Jeffrey Ford, The Beautiful Gelreesh, 2003
Thomas Ligotti, The Town Manager, 2003
Brian Evenson, The Brotherhood of Mutilation, 2003
Mark Samuels, The White Hands, 2003
Daniel Abraham, Flat Diane, 2004
Margo Lanagan, Singing My Sister Down, 2005 (Australia)
T.M. Wright, The People on the Island, 2005
Laird Barron, The Forest, 2007
Liz Williams, The Hide, 2007
Reza Negarestani, The Dust Enforcer, 2008 (Iran)
Micaela Morrissette, The Familiars, 2009

Yah - its most of the book is my favorite. For the the above stand out above the rest but the rest are also damn good.

Full Listing below:
Foreweird by Michael Moorcock
Introduction by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer
Alfred Kubin, The Other Side (excerpt), 1908 (translation, Austria)
F. Marion Crawford, The Screaming Skull, 1908
Algernon Blackwood, The Willows, 1907
Saki, Sredni Vashtar, 1910
M.R. James, Casting the Runes, 1911
Lord Dunsany, How Nuth Would Have Practiced his Art, 1912
Gustav Meyrink, The Man in the Bottle, 1912 (translation, Austria)
Georg Heym, The Dissection, 1913 (new translation, Germany)
Hanns Heinz Ewers, The Spider, 1915 (translation, Germany)
Rabindranath Tagore, The Hungry Stones, 1916 (India)
Luigi Ugolini, The Vegetable Man, 1917 (first translation, Italy)
A. Merritt, The People of the Pit, 1918
Ryunosuke Akutagawa, The Hell Screen, 1917 (new translation, Japan)
Francis Stevens (Gertrude Barrows Bennett), Unseen—Unfeared, 1919
Franz Kafka, In the Penal Colony, 1919 (translation, German/Czech)
Stefan Grabinski, The White Weyrak, 1921 (translation, Poland)
H.F. Arnold, The Night Wire, 1926
H.P. Lovecraft, The Dunwich Horror, 1929
Margaret Irwin, The Book, 1930
Jean Ray, The Mainz Psalter, 1930 (translation, Belgium)
Jean Ray, The Shadowy Street, 1931 (translation, Belgium)
Clark Ashton Smith, Genius Loci, 1933
Hagiwara Sakutaro, The Town of Cats, 1935 (translation, Japan)
Hugh Walpole, The Tarn, 1936
Bruno Schulz, Sanatorium at the Sign of the Hourglass, 1937 (translation, Poland)
Robert Barbour Johnson, Far Below, 1939
Fritz Leiber, Smoke Ghost, 1941
Leonora Carrington, White Rabbits, 1941
Donald Wollheim, Mimic, 1942
Ray Bradbury, The Crowd, 1943
William Sansom, The Long Sheet, 1944
Jorge Luis Borges, The Aleph, 1945 (translation, Argentina)
Olympe Bhely-Quenum, A Child in the Bush of Ghosts, 1949 (Benin)
Shirley Jackson, The Summer People, 1950
Margaret St. Clair, The Man Who Sold Rope to the Gnoles, 1951
Robert Bloch, The Hungry House, 1951
Augusto Monterroso, Mister Taylor, 1952 (new translation, Guatemala)
Amos Tutuola, The Complete Gentleman, 1952 (Nigeria)
Jerome Bixby, It’s a Good Life, 1953
Julio Cortázar, Axolotl, 1956 (new translation, Argentina)
William Sansom, A Woman Seldom Found, 1956
Charles Beaumont, The Howling Man, 1959
Mervyn Peake, Same Time, Same Place, 1963
Dino Buzzati, The Colomber, 1966 (new translation, Italy)
Michel Bernanos, The Other Side of the Mountain, 1967 (new translation, France)
Merce Rodoreda, The Salamander, 1967 (translation, Catalan)
Claude Seignolle, The Ghoulbird, 1967 (new translation, France)
Gahan Wilson, The Sea Was Wet As Wet Could Be, 1967
Daphne Du Maurier, Don’t Look Now, 1971
Robert Aickman, The Hospice, 1975
Dennis Etchison, It Only Comes Out at Night, 1976
James Tiptree Jr. (Alice Sheldon), The Psychologist Who Wouldn’t Do Terrible Things to Rats, 1976
Eric Basso, The Beak Doctor, 1977
Jamaica Kincaid, Mother, 1978 (Antigua and Barbuda/US)
George R.R. Martin, Sandkings, 1979
Bob Leman, Window, 1980
Ramsey Campbell, The Brood, 1980
Michael Shea, The Autopsy, 1980
William Gibson / John Shirley, The Belonging Kind, 1981
M. John Harrison, Egnaro, 1981
Joanna Russ, The Little Dirty Girl, 1982
M. John Harrison, The New Rays, 1982
Premendra Mitra, The Discovery of Telenapota, 1984 (translation, India)
F. Paul Wilson, Soft, 1984
Octavia Butler, Bloodchild, 1984
Clive Barker, In the Hills, the Cities, 1984
Leena Krohn, Tainaron, 1985 (translation, Finland)
Garry Kilworth, Hogfoot Right and Bird-hands, 1987
Lucius Shepard, Shades, 1987
Harlan Ellison, The Function of Dream Sleep, 1988
Ben Okri, Worlds That Flourish, 1988 (Nigeria)
Elizabeth Hand, The Boy in the Tree, 1989
Joyce Carol Oates, Family, 1989
Poppy Z Brite, His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood, 1990
Michal Ajvaz, The End of the Garden, 1991 (translation, Czech)
Karen Joy Fowler, The Dark, 1991
Kathe Koja, Angels in Love, 1991
Haruki Murakami, The Ice Man, 1991 (translation, Japan)
Lisa Tuttle, Replacements, 1992
Marc Laidlaw, The Diane Arbus Suicide Portfolio, 1993
Steven Utley, The Country Doctor, 1993
William Browning Spencer, The Ocean and All Its Devices, 1994
Jeffrey Ford, The Delicate, 1994
Martin Simpson, Last Rites and Resurrections, 1994
Stephen King, The Man in the Black Suit, 1994
Angela Carter, The Snow Pavilion, 1995
Craig Padawer, The Meat Garden, 1996
Stepan Chapman, The Stiff and the Stile, 1997
Tanith Lee, Yellow and Red, 1998
Kelly Link, The Specialist’s Hat, 1998
Caitlin R. Kiernan, A Redress for Andromeda, 2000
Michael Chabon, The God of Dark Laughter, 2001
China Miéville, Details, 2002
Michael Cisco, The Genius of Assassins, 2002
Neil Gaiman, Feeders and Eaters, 2002
Jeff VanderMeer, The Cage, 2002
Jeffrey Ford, The Beautiful Gelreesh, 2003
Thomas Ligotti, The Town Manager, 2003
Brian Evenson, The Brotherhood of Mutilation, 2003
Mark Samuels, The White Hands, 2003
Daniel Abraham, Flat Diane, 2004
Margo Lanagan, Singing My Sister Down, 2005 (Australia)
T.M. Wright, The People on the Island, 2005
Laird Barron, The Forest, 2007
Liz Williams, The Hide, 2007
Reza Negarestani, The Dust Enforcer, 2008 (Iran)
Micaela Morrissette, The Familiars, 2009
Steve Duffy, In the Lion’s Den, 2009
Stephen Graham Jones, Little Lambs, 2009
K.J. Bishop, Saving the Gleeful Horse, 2010 (Australia)
Afterweird by China Miéville

The introduction notes that certain stories were not included because of problems with obtaining the reproduction rights, but that the editors considered these stories as an extension of the anthology: Philip K. Dick's The Preserving Machine, J. G. Ballard's The Drowned Giant, Gabriel García Márquez's A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings and Otsuichi's The White House in the Cold Forest. ( )
1 vote modioperandi | May 12, 2020 |
An impressive compendium of Weird stories, classic and obscure, exhibiting a wide range of style, atmosphere, tone, and genre. Many entries are clearly Weird and serve almost as exemplars of the tradition. Others won't qualify for some readers, while simultaneously thrilling other readers.

Extra points for seeking out authors beyond Anglophone or even Continental influences, though I suspect this collection remains rooted in the literary world as defined by Western industrial economies. There are exceptions, but they're just that: exceptions. ( )
  elenchus | Apr 29, 2020 |
The biggest anthology I’ve ever found. Expanding on his earlier The New Weird, Vandermeer shows that he has spent a lot of care selecting these stories. There are well-known stories by H. P. Lovecraft and Clark Ashton Smith, as well as dozens of completely unknown authors like Bob Lehman who prove with one story that they are valuable contributors. The thing I like about this massive tome is that the work is taken from all over the world, not just America. A whole boatload of translators jumped on board the project and it was nice to see that the quality of the stories was uniformly good. I can only think of one other anthology that pretends to be this good and that is Dangerous Visions by Harlan Ellison. But instead of the endless essays that Ellison provides where he brags about his close personal friends who are all better writers than him, Vandermeer gives a brief description of each author’s career. What is so wrong about simply finding a gem and placing it in an anthology? I don’t care if the author was paid for the contribution or they’re long dead. I only want to read their words, see their visions and enjoy their madness. I read Vandermeer’s equally impressive Big Book of Science Fiction as well. I am also wondering if there will ever be an anthologist who can resist the temptation of anthologizing himself.
Whatever one’s opinion is of so-called weird fiction, you will probably love most of these stories. It is truly the only worthy successor to Dangerous Visions I have ever found – and yes I have read Again, Dangerous Visions…
( )
  LSPopovich | Apr 8, 2020 |
"Saving the Gleeful Horse," by K.J. Bishop (2010): 6.5
- so, I can’t feel anything but uncertain about this reading and rating. this was not the one to read in a sleep exhaustion state. It was, again, a mile-up narrative, which kind of helps here cause it lends the tone a fairy-talish quality that I think it was going for. And all the surreal picaresqueness half worked, but come on, do I really remember?

"The Other Side," by Alfred Kubin (1908): 8.5
- so, the trouble here will be revisiting the "so what" impulse, usually pretty pronounced in me, who needs a "reason" and "purpose" like some stupid pacifier. BUT, the promise here, as well, is in the multitudinous interpretive possibilities, as so clearly on display here, as seen in Kubin's (my take) metaphorical exploration of fin-de-siecle apocalypticism and pessimism and anti/philo-Americanness, done quite well with an inventiveness and playfulness I can't imagine will characterize a lot of these stories.

"The Screaming Skull," by E. Marion Crawford (1908): 9.5
- A cornucopia of delights, this one, from the gleefully half-hinged ramblings of the first-person protagonist--rendered skillfully in a casual manner and with a mixture of Victorian mannerisms and proto-modern smooth fluidity that I would not have expected at the beginning, considering both period and genre (although many of these presuppositions are gradually fading away as I read more of the actual stuff)--to the actually quite tense and skillfully plotted exposition of the ghost story at the center of the tale. But, what put it over-the-top for me, was actually the tendency of the narrator towards digression, and quite insightful digression at that. For example, the section on how sailors experience phenomena, or the section which quickly raises and disregards the 'ghost problem': “there may be ghosts or there may not be. If there are, I'm not inclined to believe that they may hurt living people except by frightening them, and, for my part, I would rather face any shape of ghost than a fog in the channel when it's crowded.”

"Little Lambs," by Stephen Graham Jones (2009): 7.75
- Sadly, I think I'm pretty bad with "weird fiction," in that it seems almost consciously geared to negatively impact all my usual literary pleasure centers, as with its emphasis on mood and description over explication, erratic over measured psychological response, and allusion over concreteness. And this seems no different, like a miniature ANNIHILATION, from what I know of the story and it's cinematic adaptation. STORY: four men stationed to watch over a mysterious "structure" in Wyoming, ostensibly that of an old jail in WV which collapsed one day and reappeared mysteriously miles away, and they're gradually drawn towards it and it's mysteries, until the narrator eventually meets a long-dead person within it, although we get the impression they've all long gone crazy regardless from their watching / interaction. What works here often is that suggestibility inherent in precisely the "weirdness" of the plot and it's ambiguities, such as the first time Tad comes across the old lumberjack while absent-mindedly meandering through the structure. What doesn't work are the potential "takeaways," or lack thereof, as were instead involved in a game of weird descriptor and disjointed narrative off. Who wins? The author more than the reader? Perhaps.

"The Willows," by Algernon Blackwood (1907): 9.25
- so, this is good. It's good, and remains nonetheless difficult to discuss. And that is because the sometimes seminar already covered Blackwood, and I don't know how much novel or interesting I will have to say that isn't mostly cribbed -- consciously or not -- for their takes: that being, primarily, that what Blackwood lacks as a horror writer, he actually makes up, to their large surprise, as an innovative and evocative nature writer. Our story: two Englishman, rafting down the Danube, put up in a heavily wooded, and very creepy, clearing, increasingly feeling themselves in the liminal Space between worlds. My major addendum to their verdict is that this is actually quite wonderful, with the interesting added wrinkle of the disjunction between the prose description of the willows and the ominous omnipresent feeling of the others around them, and the dialogue and repartee between the two men, which felt more lifelike than I would have supposed based upon the former. I wonder why this doesn't get talked about more. Maybe something to do with the strangeness of a prewar British fantastical story set outside of England. Nonetheless, it should have a more robust reputation, especially as it mixes the large cosmic unease with the more corporeal, granular, and intimate terrors of, for example, the final one-two punch of the minute description of the dead man's skin, as well as seeing him float off and begin to resemble an “otter,” thereby re-re-framing our appreciation for what exactly they been going through from the beginning.

"The Lion's Den," by Steve Duffy (2009): 9
- Strange, fittingly. The piece: seeming jumper into lions den in zoo disappears right at moment of mauling, thereafter animals start acting differently. Although, and I wonder how much this holds for most of the 'weird' stories, what makes this 'weird' rather than science fictional (or fantastic even) is simply the fact that the causal trigger is held back from us--here, namely, that we don't know exactly what the being was (or what he was doing) contacting the animals (although I can venture some guesses). Regardless, what everything hinges on here (and, necessarily, in many of these ambiguity-laden "weird" stories) is the tone. It is suitably ominous, with the prose fluid (esp. in the first half), and yet languid and contemplative at the same time -- it moves us smoothly from event to event and through the quiet, trying-not-to-freak-out mind of the zookeeper/narrator (as well as a particularly well-executed horror scene).

"Sredni Vashtar," by Saki (1910): 8.5
- The author note at the beginning describes this short little dose of pique as “enigmatic,” although I don’t read that here at all. The piece: a sick young boy is cared for by his hated cousin/guardian, until one day, in answer to his prayers, the boys godpet ferret kills her. He is quite happy about this. The enigma might come in unanswered questions that nevertheless bear little on the central “event” or even thematic concerns of the story: where are the parents? why is she the guardian? what’s the nature of this terminal disease he’s suffering from? These are less important, to me, than that quite successful, brutal, and evocative petty revenge plot at the heart of the story.

"The Familiars," by Micaela Morrissette (2009): 9.25
- A helpful course correction after reading a particular horror story so leaden, so bland, so dull as to make you forget that those are not to be taken for granted with the genre, but actually the to-be-expected byproducts of a shitty story in itself--as, here, we have, on its face, just the same: a horror STORY: boy and his mother, isolated, largely, in their large house, spend days together doing dog days of summer things before he starts school in the fall; he has, however, the friend, an imaginary friend who the mother slowly, strangely learns to fear. This story, unlike all these others, is not THE Story, however. Heartening, again, to realize, as if anew, that what makes a story is the writing -- is the craft itself. Because, a child ghost story is nothing new, and therefore all of the foreboding, the ambiguity, the wonder, and the terror are here functions of the presentation [z.B., the way in which, after two pages of innocuous child play, we get simply that "the boy woke up at dawn. the friend coalesced from under the bed."]. The prose is present tense, which primes us for the scare of the friend introduction, coming , as it did, after that seemingly bullet-pointed list of things -- it's a jolt out of the monotony of that. The prose is direct and lyrical nonetheless, and might reward (or not?) a more careful read [here it was a bit rushed, coming just before making dinner]. The details of the boy/friend/mom encounters are correctly spare and often difficult to assess in terms of the friends maliciousness or not and the mother's cognizance of the reality of the friend. She knows how to weave terrifying little tidbits here and there -- never over doing it, always leaving room for both maneuver and the reader to bring their own awareness of the danger to fill in the blanks [z.B., the friend playing a fun game asking the boy questions: most innocuous, but every few being 'how would you choose to die?' ~ and making up fake portals, with the friends behavior seeming particularly ominous].

"Casting the Runes," by M.R. James (1911): 7.75
- Not my thing, although I remain consistently impressed at level of technical invention and experimentation with/in form evident in these early stories, if not with the resultant story itself.
  Ebenmaessiger | Oct 6, 2019 |
This anthology is simply stunning. The whole is certainly more than the sum of its parts as the selection, the introduction and in particular the brief but informative author bios add to these stories, most of which themselves are of a very high level.

Individual ratings below. I feel I've rated rather low in general. Ratings purely reflect my personal enjoyment of the reading experience.

- Foreword: Michael Moorcock (no rating)
- Introduction by Ann & Jeff VanderMeer (no rating)
- Alfred Kubin, “The Other Side” (excerpt), 1908 (Austria) (**)
- F. Marion Crawford, “The Screaming Skull,” 1908 (*)
- Algernon Blackwood, “The Willows,” 1907 (***)
- Saki, “Sredni Vashtar,” 1910 (****)
- M.R. James, “Casting the Runes,” 1911 (**)
- Lord Dunsany, “How Nuth Would Have Practiced his Art,” 1912 (***)
- Gustav Meyrink, “The Man in the Bottle,” 1912 (Austria) (**)
- Georg Heym, “The Dissection,” 1913 (Germany) (**)
- Hanns Heinz Ewers, “The Spider,” 1915 (Germany) (***)
- Rabindranath Tagore, “The Hungry Stones,” 1916 (India) (**)
- Luigi Ugolini, “The Vegetable Man,” 1917 (Italy) (***)
- A. Merritt, “The People of the Pit,” 1918 (****)
- Ryunosuke Akutagawa, “The Hell Screen,” 1918 (Japan) (****)
- Francis Stevens (Gertrude Barrows Bennett), “Unseen—Unfeared,” 1919 (**)
- Franz Kafka, “In the Penal Colony,” 1919 (German/Czech) (****)
- Stefan Grabinski, “The White Weyrak,” 1921 (Poland) (**)
- H.F. Arnold, “The Night Wire,” 1926 (****)
- H.P. Lovecraft, “The Dunwich Horror,” 1929 (*****)
- Margaret Irwin, “The Book,” 1930 (***)
- Jean Ray, “The Mainz Psalter,” 1930 (Belgium) (**)
- Jean Ray, “The Shadowy Street,” 1931 (Belgium) (***)
- Clark Ashton Smith, “Genius Loci,” 1933 (***)
- Hagiwara Sakutoro, “The Town of Cats,” 1935 (Japan) (**)
- Hugh Walpole, “The Tarn,” 1936 (***)
- Bruno Schulz, “Sanatorium at the Sign of the Hourglass,” 1937 (Poland) (**)
- Robert Barbour Johnson, “Far Below,” 1939 (**)
- Fritz Leiber, “Smoke Ghost,” 1941 (****)
- Leonora Carrington, “White Rabbits,” 1941 (***)
- Donald Wollheim, “Mimic,” 1942 (****)
- Ray Bradbury, “The Crowd,” 1943 (***)
- William Sansom, “The Long Sheet,” 1944 (****)
- Jorge Luis Borges, “The Aleph,” 1945 (Argentina) (***)
- Olympe Bhely-Quenum, “A Child in the Bush of Ghosts,” 1949 (Benin) (***)
- Shirley Jackson, “The Summer People,” 1950 (****)
- Margaret St. Clair, “The Man Who Sold Rope to the Gnoles,” 1951 (****)
- Robert Bloch, “The Hungry House,” 1951 (***)
- Amos Tutuola, “The Complete Gentleman,” 1952 (Nigeria) (*)
- Jerome Bixby, “It’s a Good Life,” 1953 (****)
- Augusto Monterroso, “Mister Taylor,” 1952 (Guatemala) (****)
- Julio Cortazar, “Axolotl,” 1956 (Argentina) (*)
- William Sansom, “A Woman Seldom Found,” 1956 (*****)
- Charles Beaumont, “The Howling Man,” 1959 (****)
- Mervyn Peake, “Same Time, Same Place,” 1963 (*****)
- Dino Buzzati, “The Colomber,” 1966 (Italy) (***)
- Michel Bernanos, “The Other Side of the Mountain,” 1967 (France) (****)
- Merce Rodoreda, “The Salamander,” 1967 (Catalan) (**)
- Claude Seignolle, “The Ghoulbird,” 1967 (France) (***)
- Gahan Wilson, “The Sea Was Wet As Wet Could Be,” 1967 (****)
- Daphne Du Maurier, “Don’t Look Now,” 1971 (*****)
- Robert Aickman, “The Hospice,” 1975 (****)
- Dennis Etchison, “It Only Comes Out at Night,” 1976 (*****)
- James Tiptree Jr. (Alice Sheldon), “The Psychologist Who Wouldn’t Do Terrible Things to Rats,” 1976 (****)
- Eric Basso, “The Beak Doctor,” 1977 (**) (I wasn't able to finish this one - the plot is dreamlike and confusing but the prose - while sometimes dense - has a great rhythmic quality; also very atmospheric )
- Jamaica Kincaid, “Mother,” 1978 (Antigua and Barbuda/US) (*)
- George R.R. Martin, “Sandkings,” 1979 (*****)
- Bob Leman, “Window,” 1980 (****)
- Ramsey Campbell, “The Brood,” 1980 (****)
- Michael Shea, “The Autopsy,” 1980 (****)
- William Gibson/John Shirley, “The Belonging Kind,” 1981 (****)
- M. John Harrison, “Egnaro,” 1981 (***)
- Joanna Russ, “The Little Dirty Girl,” 1982 (****)
- M. John Harrison, “The New Rays,” 1982 (***)
- Premendra Mitra, “The Discovery of Telenapota,” 1984 (India) (****)
- F. Paul Wilson, “Soft,” 1984 (*****)
- Octavia Butler, “Bloodchild,” 1984 (*****)
- Clive Barker, “In the Hills, the Cities,” 1984 (***)
- Leena Krohn, “Tainaron,” 1985 (Finland) (****)
- Garry Kilworth, “Hogfoot Right and Bird-hands,” 1987 (***)
- Lucius Shepard, “Shades,” 1987 (*****)
- Harlan Ellison, “The Function of Dream Sleep,” 1988 (*****)
- Ben Okri, “Worlds That Flourish,” 1988 (Nigeria) (**)
- Elizabeth Hand, “The Boy in the Tree,” 1989 (***)
- Joyce Carol Oates, “Family,” 1989 (***)
- Poppy Z Brite, “His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood,” 1990 (****)
- Michal Ajvaz, “The End of the Garden,” 1991 (Czech) (**)
- Karen Joy Fowler, “The Dark,” 1991 (****)
- Kathe Koja, “Angels in Love,” 1991 (*****)
- Haruki Murakami, “The Ice Man,” 1991 (Japan) (***)
- Lisa Tuttle, “Replacements,” 1992 (*****)
- Marc Laidlaw, “The Diane Arbus Suicide Portfolio,” 1993 (****)
- Steven Utley, “The Country Doctor,” 1993 (*****)
- Martin Simpson, “Last Rites and Resurrections,” 1994 (***)
- William Browning Spencer, “The Ocean and All Its Devices,” 1994 (***)
- Jeffrey Ford, “The Delicate,” 1994 (**)
- Stephen King, “The Man in the Black Suit,” 1994 (****)
- Angela Carter, “The Snow Pavilion,” 1995 (***)
- Craig Padawer, “The Meat Garden,” 1996 (*) (This was too surreal for me, even though the pace and atmosphere were intriguing)
- Stepan Chapman, “The Stiff and the Stile,” 1997 (**)
- Tanith Lee, “Yellow and Red,” 1998 (***)
- Kelly Link, “The Specialist’s Hat,” 1998 (***)
- Caitlin R. Kiernan, “A Redress for Andromeda,” 2000 (***)
- Michael Chabon, “The God of Dark Laughter,” 2001 (***)
- China Mieville, “Details,” 2002 (**)
- Michael Cisco, “The Genius of Assassins,” 2002 (*) (DNF - This may be brilliant, but it could not hold my interest)
- Neil Gaiman, “Feeders and Eaters,” 2002 (****)
- Jeff VanderMeer, “The Cage,” 2002 (****)
- Jeffrey Ford, “The Beautiful Gelreesh,” 2003 (**)
- Thomas Ligotti, “The Town Manager,” 2003 (***)
- Brian Evenson, “The Brotherhood of Mutilation,” 2003 (****)
- Mark Samuels, “The White Hands,” 2003 (***)
- Daniel Abraham, “Flat Diane", 2004 (*****)
- Margo Lanagan, “Singing My Sister Down,” 2005 (Australia) (***)
- T.M. Wright, “The People on the Island,” 2005 (**)
- Laird Barron, “The Forest,” 2007 (****)
- Liz Williams, “The Hide,” 2007 (****)
- Reza Negarestani, “The Dust Enforcer,” 2008 (Iran) (*)
- Micaela Morrissette, “The Familiars,” 2009 (*)
- Steve Duffy, “In the Lion’s Den,” 2009 (***)
- Stephen Graham Jones, “Little Lambs,” 2009 (****)
- K.J. Bishop, “Saving the Gleeful Horse,” 2010 (Australia) (**)
- Afterword: China Mieville (no rating) ( )
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
VanderMeer, AnnEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
VanderMeer, JeffEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Abraham, DanielContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aickman, RobertContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ajvaz, MichalContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Arnold, H. F.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Barker, CliveContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Barron, LairdContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Basso, EricContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Beaumont, CharlesContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bernanos, MichelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bhêly-Quénum, OlympeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bishop, K, J.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bixby, JeromeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Blackwood, AlgernonContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bloch, RobertContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Borges, Jorge LuisContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bradbury, RayContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brite, Poppy Z.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Butler, Octavia E.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Buzzati, DinoContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Campbell, RamseyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Carrington, LeonoraContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Carter, AngelaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Chabon, MichaelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Chapman, StepanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cisco, MichaelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cortázar, JulioContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Crawford, F. MarionContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
du Maurier, DaphneContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Duffy, SteveContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ellison, HarlanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Etchison, DennisContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Evenson, BrianContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ewers, Hanns HeinzContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ford, JeffreyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Fowler, Karen JoyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gaiman, NeilContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gibson, WilliamContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Grabinski, StefanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hand, ElizabethContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Harrison, M. JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Heym, GeorgContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Irwin, MargaretContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Jackson, ShirleyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
James, M. R.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Johnson, Robert BarbourContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Jones, Stephen GrahamContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kafka, FranzContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kiernan, Caitlín R.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kilworth, GarryContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kincaid, JamaicaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
King, StephenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Koja, KatheContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Krohn, LeenaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kubin, AlfredContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Laidlaw, MarcContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lanagan, MargoContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lee, TanithContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Leiber, FritzContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Leman, BobContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ligotti, ThomasContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Link, KellyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lord DunsanyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lovecraft, H. P.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Martin, George R. R.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Merritt, AbrahamContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Meyrink, GustavContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Miéville, ChinaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Miéville, ChinaAfterwordsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mitra, PremendraContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Monterroso, AugustoContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Moorcock, MichaelForewordsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Morrissette, MicaelaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Murakami, HarukiContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Negarestani, RezaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Oates, Joyce CarolContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Okri, BenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Padawer, CraigContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Peake, MervynContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ray, JeanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rodoreda, MercèContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Russ, JoannaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
SakiContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sakutarō, HagiwaraContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Samuels, MarkContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sansom, WilliamContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Schulz, BrunoContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Seignolle, ClaudeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Shea, MichaelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Shepard, LuciusContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Shirley, JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Simpson, MartinContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Smith, Clark AshtonContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Spencer, William BrowningContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
St. Clair, MargaretContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Stevens, FrancisContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tagore, RabindranathContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tiptree, James, Jr.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tuttle, LisaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tutuola, AmosContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ugolini, LuigiContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Utley, StevenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
VanderMeer, AnnIntroductionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
VanderMeer, JeffIntroductionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
VanderMeer, JeffContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Walpole, HughContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Williams, LizContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wilson, F. PaulContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wilson, GahanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wollheim, Donald A.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wright, T. M.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

Contains

The Ocean And All Its Devices [short story] by William Browning Spencer

The Willows by Algernon Blackwood

In The Hills, The Cities by Clive Barker

Bloodchild {novelette} by Octavia E. Butler

The Screaming Skull by F. Marion Crawford

Sredni Vashtar [short story] by Saki

Casting The Runes by M. R. James

How Nuth Would Have Practised His Art Upon The Gnoles by Lord Dunsany

The Man In The Bottle [short story] by Gustav Meyrink

The Dissection by Georg Heym

The Spider {novella} by Hanns Heinz Ewers

The Vegetable Man by Luigi Ugolini

The People of the Pit {story} by A. Merritt

Hell Screen [Individual Short Story] by Ryunosuke Akutagawa

Unseen—Unfeared (short story) by Francis Stevens

In the Penal Colony by Franz Kafka

The Night Wire by H. F. Arnold

The Dunwich Horror by H. P. Lovecraft

The Mainz Psalter by Jean Ray

The Book by Margaret Irwin

The Shadowy Street by Jean Ray

Genius Loci [short story] by Clark Ashton Smith

The Town of Cats (Short story) by Hagiwara Sakutar

The Tarn by Hugh Walpole

Sanatorium At The Sign Of The Hourglass by Bruno Schulz

Far Below by Robert Barbour Johnson

Smoke Ghost [short story] by Fritz Leiber

White Rabbits by Leonora Carrington

Mimic by Donald A. Wollheim

The Crowd by Ray Bradbury

The Aleph by Jorge Luis Borges

The Immortal by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

The Dead Man by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

The Theologians by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

Story Of The Warrior And The Captive by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

The Life Of Tadeo Isidoro Cruz (1829-1874) by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

Emma Zunz by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

The House Of Asterion by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

The Other Death by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

Deutsches Requiem by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

Averroes' Search by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

The God's Script by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

Ibn Hakkan Al-Bokhari, Dead In His Labyrinth by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

The Two Kings and the Two Labyrinths (The Aleph) by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

The Waiting by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

The Man On The Threshold by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

The Zahir [short story] by Jorge Luis Borges (indirect)

A Child In The Bush Of Ghosts by Olympe Bhêly-Quénum

Shirley Jackson's The Summer People by Shirley Jackson

The Man Who Sold Rope To The Gnoles by Margaret St. Clair

The Hungry House by Robert Bloch

Mister Taylor by Augusto Monterroso

The Complete Gentleman by Amos Tutuola

It's A Good Life by Jerome Bixby

Axolotl by Julio Cortázar

A Woman Seldom Found by William Sansom

The Howling Man (Short story) by Charles Beaumont

Same Time, Same Place by Mervyn Peake

Le K by Dino Buzzati

The Salamander by Mercè Rodoreda

The Ghoulbird by Claude Seignolle

The Sea Was Wet As Wet Could Be by Gahan Wilson

The Hospice by Robert Aickman

It Only Comes Out At Night by Dennis Etchison

The Psychologist Who Wouldn't Do Awful Things to Rats by James Tiptree Jr.

Sandkings [novelette] by George R. R. Martin

Window by Bob Leman

The Brood by Ramsey Campbell

The Autopsy by Michael Shea

The Belonging Kind by William Gibson

Egnaro {story} by M. John Harrison

The Little Dirty Girl by Joanna Russ

The New Rays by M. John Harrison

The Discovery of Telenapota by Premendra Mitra

Soft by F. Paul Wilson

Hogfoot Right and Bird-Hands (short story) by Garry Kilworth

Shades by Lucius Shepard

The Function Of Dream Sleep by Harlan Ellison

Worlds That Flourish by Ben Okri

The Boy on the Tree by Elizabeth Hand

Family by Joyce Carol Oates

His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood [short story] by Poppy Z. Brite

The End Of The Garden by Michal Ajvaz

The Dark by Karen Joy Fowler

Angels in Love (short story) by Kathe Koja

The Iceman (short story) by Haruki Murakami

Replacements by Lisa Tuttle

The Diane Arbus Suicide Portfolio by Marc Laidlaw

The Country Doctor by Steven Utley

The Delicate by Jeffrey Ford

Last Rites And Resurrections by Martin Simpson

The Snow Pavilion by Angela Carter

The Meat Garden by Craig Padawer

The Stiff And The Stile by Stepan Chapman

Yellow and Red by Tanith Lee

The Specialist's Hat by Kelly Link

A Redress For Andromeda by Caitlin R. Kiernan

The God of Dark Laughter by Michael Chabon

Details by China Miéville

The Genius Of Assassins by Michael Cisco

The Cage by Jeff VanderMeer

The Beautiful Gelreesh by Jeffrey Ford

The Town Manager by Thomas Ligotti

The Brotherhood of Mutilation by Brian Evenson

Singing My Sister Down [short story] by Margo Lanagan

The People on the Island (short story) by T. M. Wright

The Forest by Laird Barron

The Hide by Liz Williams

The Dust Enforcer by Reza Negarestani

The Familiars by Micaela Morrissette

In The Lion's Den by Steve Duffy

Little Lambs by Stephen Graham Jones

Saving The Gleeful Horse by K. J. Bishop

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Dedicated to Nicolas Cheetham, Gio Clairval, and all of the editors who helped us by way of example or advice.
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A 'weird tale,' as defined by H.P. Lovecraft in his nonfiction writings and given early sanctuary within the pages of magazines like Weird Tales (est 1923) is a story that has a supernatural element but does not fall into the category of traditional ghost story or Gothic tale, both popular in the 1800s.
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A landmark, eclectic, leviathan-sized anthology of fiction's wilder, stranger, darker shores. From Lovecraft to Borges to Gaiman, a century of intrepid literary experimentation has created a corpus of dark and strange stories that transcend all known genre boundaries. Together these stories form The Weird and amongst its practitioners number some of the greatest names in twentieth and twenty-first century literature.

Exotic and esoteric, The Weird plunges you into dark domains and brings you face to face with surreal monstrosities; you won't find any elves or wizards here... but you will find the boldest and downright most peculiar stories from the last hundred years bound together in the biggest Weird collection ever assembled.

The Weird features an all star cast of authors, from classics to international bestsellers to Booker prize winners. Here are Ben Okri and George R.R. Martin, Angela Carter and Kelly Link, Franz Kafka and China Miéville, Clive Barker and Haruki Murakami, M.R. James and Neil Gaiman, Mervyn Peake and Michael Chabon, Stephen King and Daphne Du Maurier.
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